Lifestyle

How the Stress of Working Long Hours Impacts Mental Health

The pandemic may mean working from home, but that doesn’t mean a more relaxed lifestyle. Working from home can often mean longer working hours, and day after day, it eventually saps us of our energy. You have to be careful because working long hours can creep up without realizing it until you suddenly discover that … Continued

The pandemic may mean working from home, but that doesn’t mean a more relaxed lifestyle. Working from home can often mean longer working hours, and day after day, it eventually saps us of our energy. You have to be careful because working long hours can creep up without realizing it until you suddenly discover that you have a spectrum of physical and mental symptoms related to prolonged stress. 

Chronic stress requires medical intervention 

The stress of working long hours is a problem that you can’t ignore. We know that sleep is important, but we can’t escape the fact that one more thing needs to be done before calling it a day. We can’t deny that the pandemic has threatened the very fabric of homes and society, and doctors are looking at ways to address the patient’s stress needs more holistically. 

Maybe it’s time to find a therapist in NY who can show you how to live a more energized life and find a way of life that is inspired and meaningful. With Zencare.co, you can easily get help with finding a vetted therapist that understands your need for self-care. Medical intervention can aid in reducing the stress and isolation you may be feeling and show you how to get through it.

Hypertension

If you’ve got hypertension, it is quite likely that you’re also moody and suffer from anxiety. Fortunately, hypertension is a manageable condition, and the best way to bring about change with hypertension is to make lifestyle changes. There is most certainly a relationship between battling with high blood pressure and long working hours. 

Working for more than 61 hours in a week has shown an increased risk of suffering from elevated blood pressure. Studies show a decreased risk of hypertension for those who work fewer hours. People who work at home don’t stop working on Friday afternoon but continue working throughout the weekend.

Less sleep and more fatigue

It goes without saying that long working hours reduce the hours for sleep and result in fatigue the next day. Even adults are expected to sleep for at least 7 to 8 hours a night. It’s important to get the right amount of sleep to avoid the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. 

Furthermore, fewer hours of sleep can also be less quality sleep as your over-active mind can’t settle down. Some studies show that sleep deprivation contributes to poor physical and mental health. Sleep deprivation can leave you feeling exhausted, irritable and depressed.

Occupational injury

Whether working long hours at your home office or your work premises, working excessively long hours increases your risk of occupational injury. Studies show that overtime working increases your risk of some or other injury or makes you vulnerable to illness. A traumatic injury can be a stressful event and can lead to depression

Evidence shows that those injured at work, whether at home or in the office, suffer from a wider range of mental health issues such as anxiety, stress and depression. This is often brought on because of reduced earnings, the fear of someone else replacing the injured person, and the financial burden of medical treatment and its costs. 

You turn to alcohol to relax

Working 60 to 80 hours a week can make you more likely to drink excessively. This alone can increase your risk of developing life-threatening conditions. You’re prone to stressing about your work and want to ensure it’s always 100% up to date. 

You may have started using booze as a way to relax and cope, trying to juggle work with family life and other activities. Trying to finish off work-related tasks with a hangover. As you drink more, negative emotions take over, which leads to a negative impact on mental health. Alcohol can be linked to anxiety, aggression and depression.

Previous

The Strategy to Hire the Employees Who Plan to Return to Work After Great Resignation

Back to Lifestyle